Reading Skills: What to Expect at Different Ages

When I was a second grade teacher, many of my parents had many questions about their child. I wish I had found this organization and their website: Understood.org  to help answer their questions. Understood.org is one of the many excellent resources to help parents with concerns and questions.

I found a graphic and ariticle that list the reading skills a child is to acquire at certain ages. The contributor Amanda Morin state an important point: 

"Not all kids develop reading skills at the same rate. But there are some general milestones to look out for as your child grows up. Take a look at how they typically unfold."

Wayne Lee, M.Ed

The Impact of a Father's Involvement With Their Baby

The Impact of a Father's Involvement With Their Baby

Mothers play a major role in their baby's lives and in their development. What about the fathers?
According to researchers, dads who interact more with their children during the first few months of life have a positive impact on their baby’s cognitive development.

Read, Speak, Sing: Your Baby and Early Literacy

From the Canadian Pediatric Society: "Learning to read starts from birth. Whether through books, words, or songs – daily language experiences help form an emotional bond with your baby and are vital to the development of your baby’s early literacy skills."

Words on Wheels believe that reading, speaking, and singing to babies and children promote literacy skills.

Video credit: Canadian Paediatric Society/Société canadienne de pédiatrie

Building Your Baby’s Brain

Building Your Baby’s Brain

The following article was from my local public library newsletter. It was from the director, Ryan Livergood. He talks about the biggest predictor of a child's vocabulary at age three is the amount and the quality of words spoken with a child in the first three years. Ryan further states that it is a good indicator of academic success. There are numerous studies on brain development in children. All the studies provide proof that reading, talking, and interacting with your child in the first three years have a great impact on their brain development. Areas such as speech, language, and literacy are impacted. Ryan also provides tips on how to help your child. I want to share his letter, so I retyped it below:

Ain't Misbehavin'

Ain't Misbehavin'

That old song title typically also applies to most children under the age of five, as they try to figure out what the adults in their world expect of them.  It can be a confusing world for young children – AND for their parents and the adults who work with them.  We WANT to teach them behavior that our society think is acceptable – but what is the most effective way to do it?

The debate about “spare the rod, spoil the child” is pretty much in the rearview mirror.  Numerous studies have demonstrated that spanking is one of the least effective ways to teach children the social rules...

Good Books for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers

Good Books for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers

How do you choose good books for babies, toddlers, and preschoolers? Here is the first rule – choose books that you love! You will read these same books over and over and over, and enjoying them is the first gift you want to give to the little one you are reading with. The first books you choose will be with you until your infant becomes a toddler, becomes a preschooler, and goes off to kindergarten. While there are special guides for differing ages of very young children, you will find that the same book you chose for a 6 week old will still be requested when they are four or five.

So, let’s talk about books . . . .

Bobbie's Blog

Bobbie's Blog

“Simply in words heard, the average child on welfare was having half as much experience per hour (616 words per hour) as the average working-class child (1,251 words per hour) and less than one-third that of the average child in a professional family (2,153 words per hour)” (Hart & Risley 2003, 8). This is important because vocabulary development during the preschool years is related to later reading skills and school success in general.”  There is a brief overview of this research that can be found on youtube. Words on Wheels is rolling!  The long and complicated process to start a non-profit organization whose focus is on the youngest of our at-risk citizens is finally coming to fruition.  The founder, Beth Ragsdale began with a concept, then carefully built a Board of Directors who were invested in “doing it right”.